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Private power poles and cables

A fallen power pole or powerline has the potential to result in a ground fire or electric shock.

If you have private powerlines or a private power pole on your property, it's your responsibility to inspect and maintain them.  

Following the judgement given in July 2021 by the Supreme Court of Western Australia, relating to the Parkerville fire, Western Power will be inspecting private power poles that are directly connected to its network. Court processes are ongoing, which may further define responsibilities for these inspections.

Landowners with poles will still have their own obligations to inspect, maintain and replace these poles, as well as any other private power poles on their property that are not directly connected to Western Power’s network.

If you're unsure where Western Power’s network ends and where your responsibilities begin, call us on 13 10 87. 

As power poles and powerlines are routinely exposed to inclement weather conditions and pests, they're susceptible to structural damage. Damaged or degraded power poles and powerlines can lead to fires and/or electric shock so it's important that you maintain them. 

Have a qualified, licensed professional regularly inspect the condition of private power poles and powerlines as underlying structural issues or internal deteriorations may not be visible to the naked eye. 

The diagram shows the separation between network assets and privately owned assets. Further information about ownership of private power poles, powerlines and underground cables is available from Building and Energy (formerly EnergySafety).

Private power pole and network operator’s service cable

Diagram showing the separation between network assets and privately owned assets

FAQs

  • Who is responsible for inspecting private power poles?
  • Who is responsible for maintaining private power poles?
  • I’ve received a notice to replace my private pole what do I do?
  • How long will I have to replace my power pole?
  • How will Western Power inspect the pole?
  • Will you need to access my land?
  • How much will the inspection cost me?
  • Can I change to a green dome?
  • What if the private power pole is shared by neighbouring properties?
  • Are you a tenant and received a private power pole notice?

Following the judgement given in July 2021 by the Supreme Court of Western Australia, relating to the Parkerville fire, Western Power will be inspecting private power poles that are directly connected to its network. Court processes are ongoing, which may further define responsibilities for these inspections.

You are responsible for inspecting and maintaining all subsequent poles on your property.

Please be aware that depending on your configuration there may be private power poles on your property which are not directly connected to our network. You are responsible for inspecting these poles.

As the property owner, you are responsible and accountable for all privately owned poles on your property. Once we’ve inspected the first private power pole, we’ll notify you if maintenance or replacement is required, and who you need to contact to complete the work.

Depending on the condition of the pole, you’ll have either 30 or 90 days to replace it or we may advise to undertake this work in the future.

More information about private power poles can be found on the Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety website

As soon as you receive your notice, it’s best to get in contact with a local electrical contractor to come and assess the work that needs to be done to make your pole safe. This may involve remediation work such as pole reinforcement through to full pole replacement. Your electrical contractor will provide you a quote to undertake the work.

Be mindful of timeframes outlined in your notice. Contacting a qualified electrical contractor as soon as you receive your notice will ensure that work is completed before the end of the notice period and will make sure you avoid any service interruptions.

Depending on the condition of the pole, you’ll have either 30 or 90 days to replace it. You'll need to engage a licensed electrician to replace your pole with one compliant to Australian Standards within the advised timeframe otherwise for safety reasons we’ll need to disconnect your property until the installation is made safe.

We’ll visually inspect the first private pole on your property and if safe we’ll dig around the base to check the condition of the pole below ground level. We don't anticipate an electricity outage will be required but if we find your power pole is in an immediately dangerous condition, we’ll need to disconnect the property to maintain safety.

We’ll need to access your property to inspect your pole. If we need your help to access the pole (e.g. opening locked gates or ensuring animals don’t escape the property), please let us know and we'll do our best to contact you before the inspection to arrange a time convenient for you.

If you need to provide us access to your property or if you have any questions about this work please call 13 10 87 (TIS: 13 14 50 or TIY: 1800 13 13 51) or use our contact form.

There is no cost for us to inspect the first private pole on your property, however as you are responsible for it, any maintenance or replacement we’ll need to be arranged by you at your expense. If the pole isn't replaced and we have to disconnect you, there will be a reconnection fee.

Yes, if you wish to replace your pole with an underground service connection, we can discuss your requirements and work with you on an expected delivery date depending on the complexity of your unit.

We suggest you apply as soon as you receive your notice to ensure the work is carried out prior to the end of your notice period. Please advise us that you have received a private power pole replacement notice at the point of application.  

Any costs associated with this replacement will be incurred by the homeowner.

If the private power pole outlined in the notice is shared by neighbouring properties both property owners are responsible for its maintenance. We advise you to contact your neighbours to agree on a course of action to make your shared private poles safe.

If you’re a tenant at your property and receive a notice, forward it to your landlord or property manager. The private power pole is likely to be their responsibility to maintain depending on the terms of your tenancy arrangement.

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